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20121027
20121104
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plan. >> excellence. >> well executed. >> i thank you. >> a lot of criticism of fema back in katrina. today we hear nothing but good about fema. >> i thank craig would lives and breathes this stuff. >>neil: not so fast because all in rescueville is not so great. a lot of the folks they represent would like to kick them in the ass. this is the reality. welcome, everyone, not so happy friday. mr. president, you may want to wait on the "heck of a job" thing because rescue efforts have become heck of a joke for folks in the northeast fuming. because the help isn't coming. in gas. no power. no food. they have had it. >> restaurants and boats and homes are looted. >> the coast guard has not been here to help. >> come here and walk into the streets here. the water is this high. you have to wear the waders. >>neil: that is just on staten island. homes are swamps. motorists are stuck if -- in gas lines, four hours or more if you can find a place to fill in. two-thirds of gas stations even now in new york and new jersey remain shut down. out of juice. out of gas. thousands are fuming, out of p
andrew and katrina. welcome, mr. dan tony. how do you think this storm is going to rank as compared with the biggest storm ever, which was katrina, in terms of insured losses, and andrew? >> well, katrina was an $80 billion insurance convenient, not take nothing consideration the economic impact as well. and a much different type of storm. the biggest problem with sandy it is a densely populated area of the country. early on in the claims process, i believe that the estimates of $20 billion range could be close. then you also have to look at the economic impact with the new york stock exchange being closed for two days, quite a few petroleum refineries shutdown along the east coast that could have an effect, as you had in an earlier broadcast that the airlines -- >> talk me -- >> thousands of flights. >> let's say i'm a small business owner, i own a pizza shop on the jersey shore or i own a dry cleaner out in queens that was damaged, what typically is covered under my business policy that i carry and what suspect? if it's flooding is it covered? >> unfortunately, flooding is an addi
airlines to talk about the impact on the industry and the man who led fema during hurricane katrina will tell us what the federal emergency agency should expect from this storm. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker shows you the big picture on how different asset classes are performing, and it lets you go in for a closer look at areas within a class or sector that may be bucking a larger trend. i'm stephen hett of fidelity investments. the etf market tracker is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >> we talked
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
and not a problem and that was the same kind of initial reaction we got after katrina, 2005, i'm not again, not comparing the gravity of the two events, but comparing the immediate initial response over the handling of this event and what i'm noting is the distinct difference in the coverage of 2005 versus this storm in 2012. and whether it's going to be an issue a few days from know you. >> it could be. what we're seeing now that the mayor's moment of let them eat cake, passed, the marathon. i've yet to see him in staten island. >> neil: i don't know that he's been there yet. >> that's interesting. doesn't that tell you everything that your two people you listened and other lady you interviewed said. the fact of the matter is, there is a political effort to run the clock out and with the media just like they've done on libya, just like they've hidden the truth about libya, it's the hide the truth about this and the service of obama's campaign of the let's get it straight. the president-- >> and the first to take camera crews to go to staten island and show it, fox was. and other media glo
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
to katrina, that very first night when people thought the storm had passed, what we thought the conditions were, when daylight came the next morning and we found out it was vastly different and much worse. we're hoping that we don't have that situation here in new york. we don't have levees in new york, but when daylight comes, we may be open for a rude awakening. as for thathat's dangling over the city, make no mistake about it. that is extremely serious. when you have a piece of metal like that hanging, think of a hanger and something called reverse bending fatigue. you keep bending it enough, and the wind bends it and bends it, just like with a hanger, back and forth, back and forth, it will eventually break. let's hope that is not going to happen here. that's a very dangerous situation, a very large crane. now to go to the very latest on sandy's path. meteorologist rick reichmuth in the fox extreme weather center. rick? >> i walked by that crane this morning on my way to work and i saw it. i thought how is that crane still up there when you've got winds at that height gusting to 90 to
. this was not an evacuation zone. >> i can relate to your guest there, after hurricane katrina, what that is like to search for relatives. it takes days and days to figure out where folks are and sort it out. if this is search and rescue effort are we assuming people that they are trying to get to and find are okay, that they are alive, not injured, they are in fairly decent condition? >> yeah. the last we talked to executives here, from the county, no fatalities. they felt confident about that. of course until they get in there themselves and see we're not going to have final word. we're keeping fingers crossed. we do have a little bit of cell phone, it's spotty. there is no power. we were speaking to another woman before who said they had jet skis, that they stored for the winter, her husband took it out. he was ferrying people around to dry land, coming back here. people coming in reporting who is left, neighbors that need help. that is helping. daylight's important. as you know, officials here scrambling to do house-to-house searches while they have light because there's no power in the area. >> thank
katrina and 9/11. this is actually a company that charles has talked about before. take a look at how the dollar is faring today. ♪ from local communities to local businesses. the potential of yelp unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. to a currency market for everyone. the potential of fxcm unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. >> 22 minutes past the hour. i am jamie colby with your fox news minute. some subways are rolling again. none of them are going into lower manhattan which is still without power. long lines to get a shuttle bus into the city. they carry more than 5 million people a day. the commuter railroads are providing service. in the meantime, all fares are waived through midnight tomorrow night. all three new york airports are back in service. even on a limited basis. laguardia was the last to come back online due to flooding. everyone should confirm flights before heading to the airport. president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail. after three days focusing on the federal response to the storm, the president w
. >> and you talk about disaster assistance on hold, bring up hurricane katrina and memories of the bush administration which does not play well for republicans. thank you as always to chuck todd, live from the white house. >> okay. >> we will be asking you many more questions in the coming days and have the president's remarks live later this hour. ari, talk about president obama and sort of his role in all of this, whichs is to say he has to act as the commander in chief, a tricky ballet for romney and the white house as well. appear to be above it all, yuts understanding he has a couple days left and has to make his convincing argument before november 6th. >> one job in america that's 24/7 and that's the president. >> oh, no. you have not seen the way th this -- the way she goes at this job. >> i love you for that but i could never oversee any disaster -- >> maybe that's the next segment as we talk about alex wagner versus president obama and get into that. >> keep it coming. >> but people know that. people know that in their gut. and depending on the kind of president you are, ronald
the economic effects. i think comparing this episode to katrina, which is the analog a lot of people are working with, for the most part i would say on balance, there's a lot of short-term turmoil, a lot of things happening. it's the end of the month. we've already got a lot of other anxiety out there. and it's in the middle of earning season so we'll have some delays. on the other hand, if we look at markets in '05, there was an initial selloff but markets sort of gained traction, especially as people saw past the short-term economic effects and saw the lift coming from the spending. >> no doubt about it, we have end of month positioning, so if you're sitting on positions and you need to get out of those positions for whatever reason, because it's the end of the month, you can't do it. the markets are closed. and so i'm wondering if this is creating a pent-up situation where we see a heavy selloff once markets do resume on wednesday. we're hoping for wednesday. we haven't seen a two-day closing of markets, i don't think ever. >> that's right. >> i think it's possible we could see so
far in advance. >> have you covered many hurricane, katrina and isaac. compare, if you can, for us, some of the images you are seeing of sandy and images that you yourself took from those two storms? >> well, katrina was a fascinating experience, very destructive and the biggest storm i think i have seen, certainly the most destructive hurricane. i was -- dicover isaac a few months ago and irene in new york city. people are learning very quickly, the power of water. it doesn't sound that dramatic. but, boy, when you see it energized and pushed up the way sandy was, it's an awakening. >> we have had at least 69 deaths reported from sandy, so far from when it touched down in the cribbia, to here across the east coast. what about the dangers of the storms? you personally? have you ever experienced close calls? >> hurricane charlie in 2004, intensified unexpectedly and turned and came into the ponte gorda area in florida and nearly killed my partner, greg, a meteorologist and myself. i have learned to be extra careful. i was very satisfied to see how much warning was given regarding sa
know, put katrina at one end. that was $100 billion. put irene at another end. that was a $13 billion event. i've seen 30 to 50. it feels, especially after you see that aerial video of what happens on the shores of new jersey, like it may be more along the 30 to 50 range when you talk about total property damage and you talk also about lost business activity. it was down in wall street. >> especially at a time when the economy was -- there was a sense it was starting to slow down again. we haven't had the strongest economy anyway. are we more vulnerable to this? >> i don't want to say there's an up side to this, but you could have a situation where some of the construction and some of the rebuilding happens in the same quarter where you had the business loss, so you have a really net no change to gdp. if there are major construction projects undertaken -- for example, let's say they decide the biggest financial center in the world should not be a foot over sea level, that's a major investment that could have a positive back on gdp. >> that's a great point, steve. as far as the idea th
. and it reminds me of katrina, which is to say that i think that, you know, we think of the iraq war as cratering george bush's popularity, but it wasn't until katrina came along. and i think coalesce an argument that people were making which was that, you know, government had become sort of demonized by the bush white house and the republican congress and that we were seeing the potential effects of a government that couldn't respond in an emergency and that there was a substantive basis for that, for saying that we have to have a strong infrastructure. we have to be able to respond on a large scale quickly in a crisis. so i think to your point, yes. i think that is a fair argument to make right now. i think it's a little unfair that people are saying romney basically wants to abolish fema. there's a complicated debate that has a lot to do with sending responsibilities back to the states. i've heard people that romney basically wants to do away with fema. i don't think that's quite right. >> michael, there was a tweet yesterday that amused me from @lolgop who by the way everyone should follow. h
about hurricane katrina and the xwampl of the most inhe effective possible response by fema. i think our memory is a little bit off on exactly how that impacted president bush's approval ratings. in fact, after a high of 90% of approval after 9/11, president bush's approval ratings continued to decline slowly throughout the course of his remain time in office. katrina didn't produce any noticeable rapid decline in his approval ratings, even though the response was seen as quite bungled. my question to you is, given the tight time frame, even if the president did bungle his response in some way, wouldn't there be enough time for ohio voters, for example, to really have that seep in and impact their votes? >> i think there would. i mean, it's a very -- obviously, this is extremely close to election day. i think that the whole image of the president -- president bush flying over the disaster area in louisiana and just kind of looking down out of the airplane versus being there ain person. also that "heck of a job brownie" thing that he said, that really came back to haunt him. i think that
hurricane katrina they spent it on gucci bags and massage parlors and everything you can think of in addition to what was necessary. shopping is the key concern for the literally ms of people affected by the storm. who could be worse for states like new jersey than the congressional vote on how fema should spend its money? king was one of 11 members to vote against providing additional disaster relief to the victims of hurricane katrina back in 2005. >>> on a more positive note, chris christie's wish comes through. it's no secret he's a fin of bruce springsteen. over the years springsteen has not returned the love until last night. he reached out to the victims of hurricane sandy and then some. listen to this. we're a band that can't separate from the jersey shore. we'll send this out to all the people working down there, the police officers, the firemen, and also to the governor who has done such a hard job this past week. well, there you have it. the romance, the bromance isn't as one-sided anymore. >>> also, what part of the presidential election got this, 4-year-old colorad
how much money geico has made since the katrina year, how much buffett has made? a fortune. what was that, 2005? >> yeah. >> but i do wonder if you did have trading this morning, what somebody look travelers or berkshire would be trading at. >> but weaved had less hurricanes since 2005 than you would think. >> refinery, do you know anything about the plants around here? >> i don't know the specific plans, but i know that's certainly a risk. about 7% of the nation's refining is done here in new jersey and dwell wear. and they're right in the path. absolutely right in the path. so i would expect to see those guys shut in if they haven't already. which will impact obviously gas prices. >> there was speculation how you could see oil prices drop because no one will be taking supply. >> that's true. absolutely. >> paul, thank you very much. you'll be in-house with us. >> i'm weathering the storm here. >> andrew, i'm not kidding, last week, a sociologist writing for the huffington "post" said if this doesn't get us to completely try to get off all fossil fuels as quickly as we possibly
, in hurricane katrina in 2005, the team of the nypd used a helicopter to lift people who were stranded in their homes by flood water. down on staten island three people now are missing. we know that 14 people have lost their lives on staten island alone at least 54 across the area so far. as we are seeing at ground level and especially from the air, perhaps the worst physical destruction is along the jersey shore. no doubt about that. today as you saw at the top of the broadcast, president obama and new jersey governor chris christie. >> crisis makes unexpected bed fellows. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his concern and compassion for the people of our state. >> president obama returned the fair. favor. >> he has put his heart and soul in making sure that the people of new jersey bounce back better than before. >> obama and christie touring a shelter for residents who lost everything. >>. [ inaudible ] >> fema will be coordinating. >> and walking a neighborhood among the hardest hit. >> among the surprises a president not known for displaying affection showed it this day. >
company is forensic weather consultants and i've worked on a lot of hurricane related cases, katrina, hurricane wilma and ike, for the insurance companies, and also, for the attorneys and home owners pan one thing that is most difficult is the flood insurance, and when most people buy home owners insurance policy it covers wind and that alone doesn't cover flood. so, place that is didn't have flood insurance may not be able to collect from their insurance policy. so, it's much easier to collect and get insurance coverage for wind storm related events. even though, a lot of the insurance companies have what they call a wind storm deductible, which means, whether it's a named storm such as a hurricane, when it makes landfall or not, will determine what percentage of the deductible, the home owner has to pay. >> and howard, tom sullivan here, you jumped on point i was going to make about how flood insurance is, two parts about it, one, i used to have a home years ago, that was in a flood plain, designated as such. so, i had to have flood insurance, but even that, the flood insurance was
for president bush was of him hugging someone after a natural disaster. you know, the images of katrina, biggest single thing beyond the war in iraq that undermined confidence in president bush's leadership. you cannot get those images out of your head as you watch this stuff. >> except, you know what, katty kay? there is a certain appeal that i think is coming as a relief to people who are tired, who are tired of the vitriol, of the stupidity. and a politician who can work with the other side, isn't that something that in this new age of politics that's appealing? >> it's huge. and i think it's probably almost the overriding priority of whoever gets elected next tuesday is to be able to make this country governable again. and to be able to do that by bringing about a certain amount of cooperation on the things america needs to do between republicans and democrats. we saw it yesterday between chris christie and brearack oba. and it's going to be very interesting to watch today as the campaign trail resumes, whether there's a different tone. i wouldn't be surprised -- we've heard the president us
from and they're doing that with huge pumps. some of them deployed after katrina. they're pumping right now i think 700,000 gallons an hour. they hope later by later today they'll be pumping some 2 million gallons an hour. they're attacking this right now. at the same time, they try to push the debris out of their city. >> any idea, jim, how long that will take, that process of pumping it out? >> no. i don't really know how long it will take. because, you know, they're going to pump basements out. there's a high school near here. pumping that basement out. their gymnasium and back in to it so all the water's going to come out of the homes in to those lakes even as those lakes are being emptied and going to empty them all the way down to the bottom. it's certainly going to be a process. a weeklong process but at the same time the long-term outlook is here to rebuild and rebuild by memorial day, before the beginning of summer 2013. and they know that's even a tall order. may seem like seven months away, eight months away, no, there's so much work to be done in rebuilding it takes every bi
, the west coast. >> that was one of famous of our colleagues years ago, during katrina, we were talking about how many poles had been town and she looked in to the camera and said just know it stay calm, help is on the way. and we all said no one can hear you. they don't have power. it was a very heartfelt sincere help is on the way, but the people that needed it were not in front of the tv set at the time. >> you send out a reminder e-mail is down. >> and then by the time it's back up -- >> isn't it crazy that e-mail is work something. >> you're right, verizon was working. >> coming up, we'll talk to governor markell to check out the damage in delaware. well find out how his state made it through the night. up. a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. governor of getting i
. and if you don't, there's a disaster. let's just look at what happened at hurricane katrina. >> yeah. >> let's look at what happened to hurricane katrina. you know what, though? again this is part of a bigger problem with mitt romney right now and republicans and democrats that are afraid to talk about how you really save this country and tackle the debt. instead, they talked about silly things like cutting fema, cutting big bird or saying we're going to take care of all of our problems by raising some taxes on rich people. instead of talking about saving this country for the next generation. >> and also not being honest about defense. >> and both sides not being honest about defense. >> okay. thank you. >> how's that? >> good. >> i don't define fema as quote big government. >> right. >> i define entitlement programs by their numbers that are going to cripple us as, quote, big government. >> "wall street journal," barack obama -- when the history of this administration is written, maybe someone will note the difference. here is that man who promised a transformative presidency, and it amount
in lives and economic damage might be less than katrina. i know our insurance analyst has talked about the size of the liability being half, which is good news. and i think there's going to be some affect on auto sales and consumer retail spending. but, again, if those stocks take a dip, that's going to be a pretty big opportunity. because we know when you have to fix a broken window you end up with more spending. overall, this could be a boost to the economy. i think it's going to be viewed as an opportunity. i think we're seeing in some of the premarket activity. >> i never know really whether to believe that or not. i see with insurance companies and i've seen the case made, the broken window case that you eventually have to fix it. net net, replacing things that may have been -- didn't need replacing and using capital to do that, i can't believe that, you know, spending $20 billion on what you didn't have to do before can be net net be good long-term. is that really true? is that the case that economists make? >> well, i think it depends on how much credit is involved. in other wor
does to the economy. >> it does have a big impact, though. because back to katrina for example. that was $75 billion of insured losses. which meant that the economic losses were over $100 billion. so usual talking a very big deal here. companies start to assess how much the business was disrupted. accessibility to their business. the ability of their employees to come to work. you don't start to see contamination issues and environmental issues until later on. but it's unfortunate to say and you asked me a very valid question, it's unfortunate to say that i think this number could be very big. >> the other question is who pays for all of this because the flooding, a lot of this will go to the national flood insurance program. but at some point, who ends up picking up the tab. >> i think mostly the insurance companies, becky. there's three sources of ways to fund catastrophes. you have the national flood insurance program as you mentioned, but that's under fema. fema stands for federal emergency management agency. and that's basically a response mechanism and i think they're doi
, if you don't know, covered katrina for us, ap he's prone to understatements, so when he says he went through one of the most harrowing experiences he's experienced. >> says a lot. >> a pretty dramatic statement. you highlight, scott, why you can have so many deaths due to flooding in situations like this, because that water moved so fast and with so much power. >> it does, and as i said, again, at the top of the hour, i said they told us there wou about five more feet of water. we expected it to be a little more gradual than it was, and when it comes up, it comes up fast. it's not a wall of water. it's just that all of a sudden you find yourself with a lot of water around you, and then you're scrambling into your vehicles, including your satellite truck, trying to get out of there with water basically coming up over the foot. i mean, it was that bad. you know, we are all fine. everybody got out of there in one piece, and we hope to be able to send you some pictures later on this evening, or at least tomorrow morning, but it was quite an experience. >> i'll bet. scott, stay safe. you
resources well. i think government will perform well. this is not going to be katrina. when government performs well, they t re-emphasizes in people's minds that government does matter. >> what's your take on the early voting story? you have a new poll showing governor romney still in the lead and certainly they're tied, 47% each, cwhen you look at eary voting turnout. how much of an impact does this storm have on early voting turnout? >> well, some, but so many people have voted. look at ohio. a third of the voters have will be cast their votes. i think early voting has helped with the democratic base. i think the democratic base has gotten more and more enthusiastic, more and more fired up. you're seeing that with the long lines in places in urban centers which tend to be democratic. i think it's going to be a surprisingly good democratic turn youtd. >> all right. we'll leave it there. governor, good to have you on the program. >>> let's go back to julia boorst boorstin. we have more on the disney/lucas film deal. >> that's right, maria. walt disney is acquiring lucas films for $4.05
sandy didn't hit oil production facilities like hurricanes in the past, like katrina did in the gulf of mexico. so while folks are struggling in the northeast, i definitely sympathize, the situation could have been a lot worse if it hit some of the bigger petroleum sector infrastructure systems. >> and so you said prices in some parts of the country are going down. where do you think prices go in the near future? >> well, i think in pockets of the northeast that continue to be hit with supply crunches, you're going to see price increases. but for the next several weeks, i think you're going to see ripple effects of lower prices across most parts of the country. >> i see. all right. we'll leave it there. good to have you on the program, sir. thank you so much. >> my pleasure. >> see you soon. >>> up next, countdown the closely watched jobs report out first thing tomorrow morning. we'll give you the handicapping of it. stay with us. uh, i'm in a timeout because apparently riding the dog like it's a small horse is frowned upon in this establishment! luckily though, ya know, i conceal th
was tweeting about this. monday night, at the height of the storm. i heard about this. we covered katrina so much, and we covered all the horror stories of the patients there. how the generators failed or why is something to look at in days ahead. but for everybody who worked there, as a resident of the city, i want to say thank you. >> you're welcome. it was the whole team. you have to remember that 19 babies that people took one at a time. >> each had that team. incredible. thank you so much. >> you're welcome. >> thank you so much. yeah. makes your heart feel good. another critical story is in its final days from now until tuesday. president obama, mitt romney plan to campaign nonstop in battleground states. today the romney campaign added a new one to the list. is that a sign of confidence or is it a bluff? we'll talk about that. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do
't iraq. it wasn't wmds. it wasn't the horror of all of that. it was katrina and being caught sleeping and feeling like they had abandoned people in new orleans. it impacted them in a deeply personal way. these -- obviously people's lives are on the line here, too, but it also -- it's a sign of leadership. >> there is no pollster in the world who can get at the feelings, the emotions, of someone, a family, who has lost power for three or four days. what does that do to this election? that kind of emotional wild card. there's no way of telling what people feel or who they get angry at. >> one thing the president benefits from, i think, because again, i don't think the white house is going to mess this up. i bet you $10,000, they've got in the tri-state area, three extraordinarily aggressive governors, two democrats, one republican. but chris christie -- >> good way of putting it. >> cuomo and malloy is going to be very aggressive and work very close with the president and the white house because they are concerned about the people, not just the politics of it, they're concerned about th
, very surprised. i have been through a few in my career between rita, katrina, and some other ones over my career, but i have never seen one that came with this type of intensity this quick and that's moving this slow. this is a little different for us, and we've been making proper precautions to make sure we were set for this type of storm. >> absolutely. lieutenant, thanks again. appreciate your time. suzanne, i had a chance to talk to some people as i was coming in who were getting out of here, families just, you know, it's not safe, so they're at hotels and basically they're making a family event out of it. they want to be safe. they are cuddled in lobbies watching smuf our coverage as we speak. >> mike, we appreciate it. i know your mike -- it's hard to hear you there. if you kshgs just follow-up on whether or not that boardwalk is actually collapsed or not. i know there are conflicting reports about what the state of the boardwalk is it. we'll get back to you as soon as we can clear up some of that sound a little bit, and, of course, you knowing, the presidential election -- we're
been through with katrina and rita down on the gulf, you have to know that government has a purpose. i have always said that. it can be constructive. it's an umbrella on a rainy day to take the story at hand with sandy's enormous storm. but governor romney does not want to support government in the way that helps people. and that means eliminating medicare. it means not caring about seniors, not providing for pell grants. you can't flip-flop in the last hours to suggest you would embrace government. we all want government to be efficient, and president obama has been a leader. he has the smallest federal government we have had in decades under president obama. smallest number of employees, but it has been efficient enough to be effective on the east coast, rising to the occasion, to the extent that republican governors have given the president and his team compliments in their responsiveness and the mayor of new york has endorsed him. it's not about that. it's about the president wanting to support a constructive government and governor romney who is trying to be president, running aga
happened ever since 2005. of course, katrina being the top of that list. the storm right now located over buffalo. it's going to be a slow exit over the next two days. it's still remaining with clouds and raw, cool temperatures. but the devastating weather is by far over with. just some showers out there today. the rest of the halloween forecast, by the way, for the country looks just fine. the exception being out there in the northwest. of course, we'll have more about sandy and its effects on the election coming up next, harold ford jr. stay with us here on "morning joe." where others fail, droid powers through. introducing the new droid razr maxx hd by motorola. now more than ever droid does. very sore looking kinda blistery. it was like a red rash... like somebody had set a bag of hot charcoal on my neck. i was a firefighter for 24 years. but, i have never encountered such a burning sensation until i had the shingles. i remember it well. i was in the back yard doing yard work. i had this irritation going on in my lower neck. i changed shirts because i thought there was something in th
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